A Playlist for Holy Week 2.0

A Playlist for Holy Week 2.0

What a difference a year makes! This time last spring, the existential dread was starting to sink in as we hunkered down for the initial surge of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, several vaccines are being administered by the hundreds of thousands each day, businesses and schools are beginning to reopen, and there’s a general tone of optimism in the air. Of course, we still have a long way to go to reach normalcy (the multiple COVID variants are slightly worrisome…), but for the time being, hope is on the horizon.

Speaking of hope, another Holy Week is upon us. In April 2020, I created a Holy Week playlist on Spotify (which you can check out here) and enjoyed the process so much that I decided to make an entirely different one this year. This time, though, I had some input from my good friend Geoff Nelson, Director of Liturgy and Worship at New City Presbyterian Church. After some discussion, Geoff and I assembled a 3-hour playlist that brims with some amazing sacred music. Like last year’s version, this one presents an aural “journey” through the days of Holy Week and encompasses a spectrum of classical sounds along the way, from Renaissance polyphony to modern Passion settings. (You can view the lineup below; the Spotify playlist itself can be found at the bottom of this post.)

No matter your creed or belief system, we hope that this music will provide you with peace, hope, and encouragement for this time of year, as we look forward to brighter days in the future.

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Summer Writing Projects

Though COVID sadly (but understandably) canceled what would have been my third summer working at the Aspen Music Festival and School, I am grateful to have received a few writing opportunities from Aspen as well as the Music Academy of the West in Montecito. Below are the fruits of that labor, which take the form of both blog posts and program notes for each festival’s virtual summer season. Click the highlighted links below to read each piece. Enjoy!

(There might be one more blog post in the pipeline for Music Academy of the West, but I’m not 100% sure at the moment. If it does go through, I will add it to the list below.)

“Driven into Paradise: Émigré Composers at the Music Academy of the West” – Blog post (Music Academy of the West, July 4, 2020)

“What’s in a (Nick)name?” – Program note for a virtual, spliced-together performance of the finale from Haydn’s “London” Symphony, played by Academy fellows (Music Academy of the West, July 9, 2020)

“Notes Before a Recital” – Two program notes for a virtual recital of Handel, Bach, Ives, and Bolcom, presented by pianist Jeremy Denk (Music Academy of the West, July 16, 2020)

“Serious Frivolity: Juggling the Profound and the Lighthearted in Beethoven’s Third and Fifth Cello Sonatas” – Blog post accompanying a virtual recital of two of Beethoven’s Cello Sonatas, performed by cellist Alisa Weilerstein and pianist Inon Barnatan (Aspen Music Festival and School, July 27, 2020)

Favorite Albums of 2018

Favorite Albums of 2018

In the blink of an eye, another year has come and gone. And once again, amidst the good and the bad, the uplifting and the cringy, the triumphs and the tragedies, music remained a remarkable constant—a wellspring of every possible human emotion and a beacon of hope for our crazy world.

Below are ten of my favorite albums that were released in 2018, along with a handful of honorable mentions (since it was difficult to choose only ten!). In no particular order, here they are:

Er-Gene Kahng, Ryan Cockerham & Janáček Philharmonic – Florence Price: Violin Concertos (Albany Records)

“Florence Price” is a name that is slowly gaining some well-deserved recognition in the classical music realm. Just this year, prominent articles from The New York Times, The New Yorkerand NPR highlighted this boundary-breaking African American composer, and the first-ever recording of her two violin concertos was released back in February. Price’s music is gorgeous and immediately accessible—hints of Dvořák and Delius appear here and there, yet it still displays a distinct compositional voice. Here’s hoping that this recording will spark continued recognition for Price’s output in the coming years.


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